Blurb Your Enthusiasm by Louise Willder

At last, I’m caught up reviewing September releases! It’s one of the busier months in the publishing calendar, so I shouldn’t be surprised that I had such a bounteous crop. Now I can pay more attention to R.I.P. selections, catching up on others’ blog posts, and getting ahead before the start of Novellas in November.

Blurb Your Enthusiasm is a delightful bibliophile’s miscellany with a great title – not just for the play on words, but also for how it encapsulates what this is about: ways of pithily spreading excitement about books. The first part of the subtitle, “An A–Z of Literary Persuasion,” is puzzling in that the structure is scattershot rather than strictly alphabetical, but the second is perfect: from the title and cover to the contents, Louise Willder is interested in what convinces people to acquire and read a book.

Over the last 25 years, she has written the jacket copy for thousands of Penguin releases, so she has it down to a science as well as an art. Book reviewing seems to me to be an adjacent skill. I know from nine years of freelance writing about books, in which I’ve had to produce reviews ranging from 100 to 2,000 words, that the shortest and most formulaic reviews can be the most difficult to compose, but are also excellent writing discipline. As Willder puts it, “Writing short, for whatever reason you do it, forces rigour, and it reminds you that words are a precious and powerful resource. Form both limits and liberates.”

How to do justice to the complexity of several hundred pages of an author’s hard work in just 150 words or so? How to suggest the tone and contents without a) resorting to clichés (“luminous” and “unflinching” are a couple of my bugbears), b) giving too much away, c) overstating the case, or misleading anyone about the merits of a Marmite book, or d) committing the cardinal sin of boring readers before they’ve even opened to the first page?

it can be easy to forget that a potential reader hasn’t read it: they don’t know anything about it. You can’t sell them the experience of the book – you have to sell them the expectation of reading it; the idea of it. And that’s when a copywriter can be an author’s best friend.

[An aside: Literary critics and blog reviewers generally see themselves as having different roles: making objective (pah!) pronouncements about literary value versus cheerleading for the books they love and want others to discover (a sort of unpaid partnership with publicists). I’m in the odd position of being both, and feel I engage in the two activities pretty much equally, perhaps leaning more towards the former. There’s some crossover, of course, with bloggers such as myself happy to publish the occasional more critical review. But we aren’t generally, as Willder is, in the business of selling books, so unless we’re pals with the author on Twitter we don’t tend to have a vested interest in seeing the book do well.]

Each reader will home in on certain topics here: the art of the first line, Dickens’s serialization and self-promotion, Orwell’s guidelines for good writing, the differences between British and American jacket copy, the use of punctuation, and so much more. I particularly loved the mock and bad blurbs she cites (we’ve both commented on the ludicrous one for The Country Girls!), including one an AI created for this book, and her rundown of the conventions of blurb-writing for various genres, everything from children’s books to science fiction. She frequently breaks her own rules (e.g., she’s anti-adjective and -ellipses, yet I found five of the one and two of the other in the Crace blurb; see below) and is very funny to boot.

Here’s some of the bookish and word-nerd trivia that captivated me:

  • J. D. Salinger didn’t allow blurbs on his books.
  • The American usage of the word “blurb” is for advance review quotes that fellow authors contribute for inclusion on the cover. I didn’t realize I used the word interchangeably for either meaning; in the UK, one might call such a quote a “puff.”
  • Marshall McLuhan invented the “page 69 test” – to decide whether you want to buy/read a book, turn to that page instead of (or maybe in addition to) looking at the first paragraph.
  • A New York publishing CEO once joked that Lincoln’s Doctor’s Dog would be an optimal title to appeal to readers (respected president + health + animal), but there are actually now six books bearing some variation on that title and all were presumably flops!
  • “Wackaging” is the word for quirky marketing that has products talk to us (Innocent Smoothies, established in 1999, is thought to have started the trend).
  • I pulled out my copy of Jim Crace’s Quarantine to see how Willder managed to write a blurb about a novel about Jesus without mentioning Jesus (“a Galilean who they say has the power to work miracles”)!

Some more favourite lines:

“There’s always something to love and learn from in a book, especially if it lasts as long as these books [children’s classics] have, and part of the job of people like me is to pick out what makes it special and pass it on.”

“always ask yourself, what’s really going on here? Why should anyone care? And how do we make them care?”

For all of us who value books, whether we write about them or not, those seem like important points to remember. We read to learn, but also to feel, and when we share our love of books with other people we can do so on the basis of how they have engaged our brains and hearts. This was thoroughly entertaining and has prompted me to pay that bit more attention to the few paragraphs on the inside of a book jacket. (See also Susan’s review.)

With thanks to Oneworld for the free copy for review.

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12 responses

  1. This was such an entertaining and informative read, wasn’t it? So glad you enjoyed it, Rebecca, and thanks for the link.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Custom made to appeal to readers like us! And I agree with you that it would make a great bookish Christmas gift this year.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, I definitely want to read this one. And I think my library should get a copy, don’t you?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m pleased that you’re interested. And it does seem like one for libraries to own, being of wide reference value.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This sounds my sort of book –a book about books, about writing for and about books, about doing so wittily and with insight, and about how to get it as right as possible. Thanks for the nudge!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s just what it is — I’m glad I’ve conveyed it successfully. Enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I must get a wiggle on and read this one, having been sent a copy. Irresistible – I love all the facts and quotes you’ve pulled out, and I look forward to finding my own intriguing nuggets.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s great; you’ll love it!

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  5. Ahhhh this sounds so much fun! I’d quite like to write book jacket cover for a living. Reckon it’s very review-adjacent. (Actually I feel like I do the equivalent of this for some of my bookshop customers anyway!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Book reviewing has prepared us very well for this theoretical career, I should think! I’ve only written one official blurb, as a freelance job for a PR company, and agonized over it for ages. I also attempted one official puff, thinking I’d got in there early enough that maybe they’d use it, even though I’m not a published author, but alas. (Though I do think they heeded my suggestion re: a change of subtitle.)

      Liked by 1 person

  6. […] since I read Blurb Your Enthusiasm, I’ve been paying more attention to jacket copy. This is an example of a great synopsis that […]

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  7. […] Blurb Your Enthusiasm: An A-Z of Literary Persuasion by Louise Willder: A delightful bibliophile’s miscellany about ways of pithily spreading excitement about books. Over the last 25 years, Willder has written jacket copy for thousands of Penguin releases, so she has it down to a science as well as an art. (Reviewing is an adjacent skill.) The art of the first line, serialization and self-promotion, guidelines for good writing, differences between British and American jacket copy, the use of punctuation, and so much more. Very funny to boot. […]

    Like

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