Short Stories in September, Part II: Andreades, Ferris, Fliss and Mulvey

It’s my aim to read as many short story collections as possible in September. After a first three earlier in the month, here are my next four.

 

Brown Girls by Daphne Palasi Andreades (2022)

It was Susan’s review that first enticed me to read this linked story collection. I’m always intrigued by the use of the first-person plural, though it can have downsides – in trying to be inclusive of the breadth of experiences of the “us,” the content can edge toward generic. I worried things were going that way in the early chapters about girlhood “in the dregs of Queens, New York,” but the more I read the more I admired Andreades’s debut. Each chapter is a fantastic thematic fragment adding up to a glistening mosaic of what it means to be a woman of colour in the USA. Desires and ambitions shift as they move from childhood to adolescence to college years to young adulthood, but some things stay the same: their parents’ high expectations, the pull of various cultures, and near-daily microaggressions.

Our families’ legacies, the histories we’ve inherited: grandparents who never learned to read, U.S.-backed dictatorships, bombs, wars, refugee camps, naval bases, canals, gold, diamonds, oil, missionaries, brain drain, the American Dream.

No matter their zip code or tax bracket, listen as these white people deem us and our families the good immigrants, the hard-working onesnot like the lazy people in this country who are a burden on the system.

The fulcrum is the sudden death of one of their number, Trish, which has repercussions through the second half of the book. It raises questions of mental health and whether friendships will last even when they move beyond Queens.

I especially loved Part Five, about a trip back to the motherland that leaves the brown girls disoriented from simultaneous sensations of connection, privilege and foreignness. “The colonized, the colonizer. Where do we fall?” My individual favourite chapters were “Duty,” about giving up on parentally prescribed medical studies to pursue a passion for art; “Patriotic,” about deciding whether or not to have children; and “Our Not-Reflections,” about age allowing them to understand what their mothers went through when they were new to the country. One critique: I would have omitted the final Part Eight, which is about Covid and death in general; the book didn’t need an update to feel timely. It’s a shame this wasn’t at least longlisted for the Women’s Prize this past year. (New purchase with a book token)  

 

The Dinner Party by Joshua Ferris (2017)

I’ve read a couple of Ferris’s novels but this collection had passed me by. “More Abandon (Or Whatever Happened to Joe Pope?)” is set in the same office building as Then We Came to the End. Most of the entries take place in New York City or Chicago, with “Life in the Heart of the Dead” standing out for its Prague setting. The title story, which opens the book, sets the tone: bristly, gloomy, urbane, a little bit absurd. A couple are expecting their friends to arrive for dinner any moment, but the evening wears away and they never turn up. The husband decides to go over there and give them a piece of his mind, only to find that they’re hosting their own party. The betrayal only draws attention to the underlying unrest in the original couple’s marriage. “Why do I have this life?” the wife asks towards the close.

Marital discontent and/or infidelity is a recurring feature, showing up in “A Night Out” and “The Breeze,” which presents the different ways a couple’s evening might have gone. I liked this line about the difficulty of overcoming incompatibilities: “Why could she not be more like him and why could he not be more like her?” It seems from my short story reading that there is always one story I would give a different title. Here I would rename “The Valetudinarian” (about a Florida retiree who ends up in a comical health crisis) “They don’t give you a manual” after his repeated catchphrase.

A few of the 11 stories weren’t so memorable, but the collection ends with a bang. “A Fair Price” appears to have a typically feeble male protagonist, frustrated that the man he’s hired to help move his belongings out of a storage unit is so taciturn, but the innocuous setup hides a horrific potential. (Public library)

 

The Predatory Animal Ball by Jennifer Fliss (2021)

These 40 flash fiction stories try on a dizzying array of genres and situations. They vary in length from a paragraph (e.g., “Pigeons”) to 5–8 pages, and range from historical to dystopian. A couple of stories are in the second person (“Dandelions” was a standout) and a few in the first-person plural. Some have unusual POV characters. “A Greater Folly Is Hard to Imagine,” whose name comes from a William Morris letter, seems like a riff on “The Yellow Wallpaper,” but with the very wall décor to blame. “Degrees” and “The Thick Green Ribbon” are terrifying/amazing for how quickly things go from fine to apocalyptically bad.

Grief and especially pregnancy loss are repeated elements. In “Yolk,” a woman finds a chicken embryo inside a cracked egg and it brings back memories of her recent stillbirth. In “All Your Household Needs,” a bereaved voice-over artist sympathizes with a child who picks up a stuffed Lucky the Dog whose speech she recorded. In “What Goes with Us,” an unreturned library book is a treasured reminder of a dead partner; “May His Memory Be a Blessing” lists many other such mementoes. Even the title story, whose main character is a mouse, opens with the loss of a loved one and posits compassion from an unexpected source.

It’s hard to get a sense of an author’s overall style from such disparate material, so I was pleased to learn that Fliss is working on her first novel, which I’ll be keen to read.

With thanks to publicist Lori Hettler for the e-copy for review.

 

Hearts & Bones: Love Songs for Late Youth by Niamh Mulvey (2022)

Having read these 10 stories over the course of a few months, I now struggle to remember what many of them were about. If there’s an overarching theme, it’s (young) women’s relationships. “My First Marina,” about a teenager discovering her sexual power and the potential danger of peer pressure in a friendship, is similar to the title story of Milk Blood Heat by Dantiel W. Moniz. In “Mother’s Day,” a woman hopes that a pregnancy will prompt a reconciliation between her and her estranged mother. In “Childcare,” a girl and her grandmother join forces against the mum/daughter, a would-be actress. “Currency” is in the second person, with the rest fairly equally split between first and third person. “The Doll” is an odd one about a ventriloquist’s dummy and repeats events from three perspectives.

I had two favourites: “Feathers” and “Good for You, Cecilia.” In the former, a woman rethinks her relationship with her boyfriend when the 2010 volcanic eruption restricts her to his French flat and she gets chatting with his cleaner. In the latter, a mother and daughter go to watch their daughter/sister’s dance recital in Dublin and witness the fall of a statue of St. Cecilia in a church they stop into. These are all matter-of-fact, somewhat detached stories set in European cities over the last decade or so. None of the protagonists had me particularly emotionally engaged with their plights. Overall, this felt reminiscent of Wendy Erskine’s work (I’ve reviewed Dance Move), but not as original or powerful.

With thanks to Picador for the proof copy for review.

 

Currently reading: Ms. Hempel Chronicles by Sarah Shun-lien Bynum, Delicate Edible Birds by Lauren Groff, Playing Sardines by Michèle Roberts

Up next: The High Places by Fiona McFarlane, Birds of America by Lorrie Moore

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16 responses

  1. I’m so glad you enjoyed Brown Girls, Rebecca, and thanks for the link. Like you, I was sorry it didn’t snag the Women’s Prize judges’ attention. I enjoyed the Mulvey more than you but agree that Erskine’s collection is better.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m grateful to you for making me aware of it!

      I’ll have to seek out Erskine’s first collection.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I wonder if linked short story collections are eligible for the Women’s Prize? I’d definitely include them if it was up to me, but not sure where the Prize stands on this (or if publishers submit them).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think it was marketed as a novel, and all of the short chapters together do feel like a coherent narrative rather than separate stories. It’s interesting to think about how the same book could be labelled in different ways depending on the market!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I like the sound of the Ferris, and would definitely read Brown Girls too. I should read more short stories – I always say that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too — that’s why I force myself to focus on them in September! But ideally I’d be so inspired I’d keep up the habit the rest of the year.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I didn’t think of Brown Girls as short stories so that’s interesting. But I can see how it could be. I might get to one of the short volumes I picked up from the New Bookshop, otherwise I will never get into double figures this month!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s interesting — Susan describing it as a linked collection with first-person plural narration was mainly what drew me to it. But it looks like publishers decided to treat it as a novel.

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  5. Brown girls is on my tbr. Thanks for indirectly reminding me about it. Sounds as great as it did when I first came across it.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I really need to read more short stories. Brown Girls seems a good place to start.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It went under the radar earlier this year and should have gotten more attention.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. […] September, nearly matching last year’s 12. I’ve already written about the first three and the next four. I’ll give details on a few more, but the final 1.5 are going to be part of a later Three on a […]

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  8. […] Prize-longlisted Red at the Bone, and I liked them about the same. A problem for me was that Brown Girls, which, with its New York City setting and focus on friendships between girls of colour, must have […]

    Like

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